Friday, 9 December 2011

Governor's Pardon

J the boss is here, putting the finishing touches to the back door, which - to anyone (sadly, not I) with a practised eye and a knowledge of old-fashioned joinery - is an impressive work of craftsmanship; I had to be given a guided tour of the external and internal rebates and staggered joints, and the skills needed to fit it into the drunken angles of an old garden wall and a lumpy sort of house wall, while following the preferences of a customer who wanted more window and less door, thus throwing out all the standard measurements.


Anyhoo, while J was here, I took the opportunity to discuss the possibility of salvaging the old kitchen door. And yes, it is entirely possible.



The door will be raised a little, more timber will be added to the bottom, clear glass will be fitted (that's just a pane covered by hideous sticky-plastic window film!), hinges will be reversed, and the old Suffolk latch will be re-used too. No problem, says J.

I didn't mention cutting a hole for a cat flap. Perhaps I ought to do that now, while J is in a can-do mood....

Note: A cat flap is required in this interior door because if one was put in the new back door, Hamish and Scooter could bypass me entirely, coming in to the utility room unseen, bolting their food, and legging it as soon as they heard me. Instead, they must come in from the garden to the kitchen, then through this door into the utility, where their food bowls will be placed above dog height. (I know, it's complicated....)


It's part of the enforced relationship with me that I have cruelly imposed on them: I know my limited place as the lowly provider of dinner, but I reserve the right to actually set eyes on these two thankless little cats at least twice a day. Low cunning is essential when dealing with them. And infinite patience.

10 comments:

hasenschneck said...

Love the idea of your thankless little cats. Mine are so the opposite! Always in my face, saying hello. Sometimes it drives me mad.

Toffeeapple said...

Well now that is good news that the door can be salvaged. I would ask now about the cat-flap, as you say. Good luck.

jabblog said...

Nearly there now - great stuff.

the veg artist said...

That little door looks from the outside as though it should be longer anyway. No carpenter worth his salt would have made a door with 3 inches above the top cross bar and nothing below the bottom one. It's probably on it's second or third life already - you will be restoring it to nearer its original proportions!

frayedattheedge said...

Malcolm says to remind you that the latch is otherwise known as a sneck - don't forget your Geordie heritage!
The house we had in Cambridgeshire had a catflap - very handy for putting the hose from the tumbler drier through!!

moreidlethoughts said...

Mrs Danvers?

Arthur Ransome said...

I'm so glad you've given the door another chance. About the top being bigger than the bottom - I'd heard that the bottom boards get worn away with water from all the floor washing through the years, but I've no idea if this is true. I would reckon that a catflap is possible. I've had little doors cut in all my interior doors (honestly, it doesn't half look strange) so that the cats can come and go without my being their constant door opener. And I would call it a sneck too - Scots/Irish from my mum. I only said latch yesterday to be understood by you English!

Isabelle said...

Sneck, yes, we say that here in Edinburgh.

It's looking very promising!

judy in ky said...

Way to handle those "boys", cat mama!

Gwen Buchanan said...

My sister lived in a house in British Columbia with a cat door and she had frequent visits form the neighborhood raccoons helping themselves to anything they could grab.. have you ever had any uninvited visitors?

I love everything you have done to the place.. you have an excellent eye!!

Related Posts with Thumbnails